Crystalens accommodating lens reviews

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The FDA approved the original version of Crystalens in 2003, at which time it was developed and marketed by a startup company called eyeonics.Bausch Lomb acquired Crystalens in early 2008; and in June of that year, the FDA approved a “high-definition” version of Crystalens, which incorporates an optic designed for better near vision.That is not enough to give patients good distance and near vision, although it may suffice for good distance and intermediate vision.Some critics claim that a single-optic IOL can’t possibly move enough with the eye to produce a substantial change in power.

As a result, currently approved accommodating lenses typically can’t provide a full range of vision.Moreover, use of these IOLs has grown only 6% per year since 2010. New presbyopia-correcting IOLs, including accommodating and toric accommodating designs, are being developed with an eye toward expanding the stunted market.forecasts nearly 11% growth in presbyopia-correcting IOLs through the end of 2016 as new options become available. Presbyopia correction can be approached in a number of ways.Like the lens of a camera, the eye’s natural lens can change its focus and allow us to see objects up close, a process called “accommodation.” During cataract surgery, the natural lens is replaced by an artificial lens, and traditionally these artificial IOLs have been limited to allowing clear vision at only one distance.This technology is known as a non-accommodating “monofocal” IOL.

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